Delivering a primary-level non-communicable disease programme for Syrian refugees and the host population in Jordan: a descriptive costing study

1 mese ago
Delivering a primary-level non-communicable disease programme for Syrian refugees and the host population in Jordan: a descriptive costing study Ansbro, E; Garry, S; Karir, V; Reddy, A; Jobanputra, K; Fardous, T; Sadique, Z The Syrian conflict has caused enormous displacement of a population with a high non-communicable disease (NCD) burden into surrounding countries, overwhelming health systems’ NCD care capacity. Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) developed a primary-level NCD programme, serving Syrian refugees and the host population in Irbid, Jordan, to assist the response. Cost data, which are currently lacking, may support programme adaptation and system scale up of such NCD services. This descriptive costing study from the provider perspective explored financial costs of the MSF NCD programme. We estimated annual total, per patient and per consultation costs for 2015–17 using a combined ingredients-based and step-down allocation approach. Data were collected via programme budgets, facility records, direct observation and informal interviews. Scenario analyses explored the impact of varying procurement processes, consultation frequency and task sharing. Total annual programme cost ranged from 4 to 6 million International Dollars (INT$), increasing annually from INT$4 206 481 (2015) to INT$6 739 438 (2017), with costs driven mainly by human resources and drugs. Per patient per year cost increased 23% from INT$1424 (2015) to 1751 (2016), and by 9% to 1904 (2017), while cost per consultation increased from INT$209 to 253 (2015–17). Annual cost increases reflected growing patient load and increasing service complexity throughout 2015–17. A scenario importing all medications cut total costs by 31%, while negotiating importation of high-cost items offered 13% savings. Leveraging pooled procurement for local purchasing could save 20%. Staff costs were more sensitive to reducing clinical review frequency than to task sharing review to nurses. Over 1000 extra patients could be enrolled without additional staffing cost if care delivery was restructured. Total costs significantly exceeded costs reported for NCD care in low-income humanitarian contexts. Efficiencies gained by revising procurement and/or restructuring consultation models could confer cost savings or facilitate cohort expansion. Cost effectiveness studies of adapted models are recommended.

Humoral and cellular immune response induced by rVSVΔG-ZEBOV-GP vaccine among frontline workers during the 2013-2016 West Africa Ebola outbreak in Guinea

1 mese 1 settimana ago
Humoral and cellular immune response induced by rVSVΔG-ZEBOV-GP vaccine among frontline workers during the 2013-2016 West Africa Ebola outbreak in Guinea Boum, Y; Juan-Giner, A; Hitchings, M; Soumah, A; Strecker, T; Sadjo, M; Cuthbertson, H; Hayes, P; Tchaton, M; Jemmy, JP; Clarck, C; King, D; Faga, EM; Becker, S; Halis, B; Gunnstein, N; Carroll, M; Røttingen, JA; Kondé, MK; Doumbia, M; Henao-Restrepo, AM; Kieny, MP; Cisse, M; Draguez, B; Grais, RF Background As part of a Phase III trial with the Ebola vaccine rVSVΔG-ZEBOV-GP in Guinea, we invited frontline workers (FLWs) to participate in a sub-study to provide additional information on the immunogenicity of the vaccine. Methods We conducted an open‐label, non‐randomized, single-arm immunogenicity evaluation of one dose of rVSVΔG-ZEBOV-GP among healthy FLWs in Guinea. FLWs who refused vaccination were offered to participate as a control group. We followed participants for 84 days with a subset followed-up for 180 days. The primary endpoint was immune response, as measured by ELISA for ZEBOV-glycoprotein–specific antibodies (ELISA-GP) at 28 days. We also conducted neutralization, whole virion ELISA and enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay for cellular response. Results A total of 1172 participants received one dose of vaccine and were followed-up for 84 days, among them 114 participants were followed-up for 180 days. Additionally, 99 participants were included in the control group and followed up for 180 days. Overall, 86.4% (95% CI 84.1–88.4) of vaccinated participants seroresponded at 28 days post-vaccination (ELISA- GP) with 65% of these seroresponding at 14 days post-vaccination. Among those who seroresponded at 28 days, 90.7% (95% CI 82.0–95.4) were still seropositive at 180 days. The proportion of seropositivity in the unvaccinated group was 0.0% (95% CI 0.0–3.8) at 28 days and 5.4% (95% CI 2.1–13.1) at 180 days post-vaccination. We found weak correlation between ELISA-GP and neutralization at baseline but significant pairwise correlation at 28 days post-vaccination. Among samples analysed for cellular response, only 1 (2.2%) exhibited responses towards the Zaire Ebola glycoprotein (Ebola GP ≥ 10) at baseline, 10 (13.5%) at day 28 post-vaccination and 27 (48.2%) at Day 180. Conclusions We found one dose of rVSVΔG-ZEBOV-GP to be highly immunogenic at 28- and 180-days post vaccination among frontline workers in Guinea. We also found a cellular response that increased with time.

Clinical and epidemiological performance of WHO Ebola case definitions: a systematic review and meta-analysis

1 mese 1 settimana ago
Clinical and epidemiological performance of WHO Ebola case definitions: a systematic review and meta-analysis Caleo, G; Theocharaki, F; Lokuge, K; Weiss, HA; Inamdar, L; Grandesso, F; Danis, K; Pedalino, B; Kobinger, G; Sprecher, A; Greig, J; Di Tanna, GL Background Ebola virus disease case definition is a crucial surveillance tool to detect suspected cases for referral and as a screening tool for clinicians to support admission and laboratory testing decisions at Ebola health facilities. We aimed to assess the performance of the WHO Ebola virus disease case definitions and other screening scores. Methods In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we searched PubMed, Scopus, Embase, and Web of Science for studies published in English between June 13, 1978, and Jan 14, 2020. We included studies that estimated the sensitivity and specificity of WHO Ebola virus disease case definitions, clinical and epidemiological characteristics (symptoms at admission and contact history), and predictive risk scores against the reference standard (laboratory-confirmed Ebola virus disease). Summary estimates of sensitivity and specificity were calculated using bivariate and hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic (when four or more studies provided data) or random-effects meta-analysis (fewer than four studies provided data). Findings We identified 2493 publications, of which 14 studies from four countries (Sierra Leone, Guinea, Liberia, and Angola) were included in the analysis. 12 021 people with suspected disease were included, of whom 4874 were confirmed as positive for Ebola virus infection. Six studies explored the performance of WHO case definitions in non-paediatric populations, and in all of these studies, suspected and probable cases were combined and could not be disaggregated for analysis. The pooled sensitivity of the WHO Ebola virus disease case definitions from these studies was 81·5% (95% CI 74·1–87·2) and pooled specificity was 35·7% (28·5–43·6). History of contact or epidemiological link was a key predictor for the WHO case definitions (seven studies) and for risk scores (six studies). The most sensitive symptom was intense fatigue (79·0% [95% CI 74·4–83·0]), assessed in seven studies, and the least sensitive symptom was pain behind the eyes (1·0% [0·0–7·0]), assessed in three studies. The performance of fever as a symptom varied depending on the cutoff used to define fever. Interpretation WHO Ebola virus disease case definitions perform suboptimally to identify cases at both community level and during triage at Ebola health facilities. Inclusion of intense fatigue as a key symptom and contact history could improve the performance of case definitions, but implementation of these changes will require effective collaboration with, and trust of, affected communities. We regret this article is behind a paywall.

Does community-wide water chlorination reduce hepatitis E virus infections during an outbreak? a geospatial analysis of data from an outbreak in Am Timan, Chad (2016–2017)

2 mesi ago
Does community-wide water chlorination reduce hepatitis E virus infections during an outbreak? a geospatial analysis of data from an outbreak in Am Timan, Chad (2016–2017) Lenglet, A; Ehlkes, L; Taylor, D; Fesselet, JF; Nassariman, JN; Ahamat, A; Chen, A; Noh, I; Moustapha, A; Spina, A Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) genotype 1 and 2 infect an estimated 20 million people each year, via the faecal-oral transmission route. An urban outbreak of HEV occurred in Am Timan, Chad, between September 2016 and April 2017. As part of the outbreak response, Médecins Sans Frontières and the Ministry of Health implemented water and hygiene interventions, including the chlorination of town water sources. We aimed to understand whether these water treatment activities had any impact on the number of HEV infections, using geospatial analysis of epidemiological and water treatment monitoring data. By conducting cluster analysis we investigated whether there were areas of particularly high and low infection risk during the outbreak and explored the reasons for this. We observed two high-risk spatial clusters of suspected cases and one high-risk cluster of confirmed cases. Our main finding was that confirmed HEV cases had a higher median number of days of exposure to unsafe water compared to suspected and non-confirmed cases (Kruskal-Wallis Chi Square: 15.5; p < 0.001). Our study confirms the mixed, but shifting, transmission routes during this outbreak. It also highlights the spatial and temporal analytical methods, which can be employed in future outbreaks to improve understanding of HEV transmission.

Setting up a nurse-led model of care for management of hypertension and diabetes mellitus in a high HIV prevalence context in rural Zimbabwe: a descriptive study

2 mesi ago
Setting up a nurse-led model of care for management of hypertension and diabetes mellitus in a high HIV prevalence context in rural Zimbabwe: a descriptive study Frieden, M; Zamba, B; Mukumbi, N; Mafaune, PT; Makumbe, B; Irungu, E; Moneti, V; Isaakidis, P; Garone, D; Prasai, M Background In the light of the increasing burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) on health systems in low- and middle-income countries, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa, context-adapted, cost-effective service delivery models are now required as a matter of urgency. We describe the experience of setting up and organising a nurse-led Diabetes Mellitus (DM) and Hypertension (HTN) model of care in rural Zimbabwe, a low-income country with unique socio-economic challenges and a dual disease burden of HIV and NCDs. Methods Mirroring the HIV experience, we designed a conceptual framework with 9 key enablers: decentralization of services, integration of care, simplification of management guidelines, mentoring and task-sharing, provision of affordable medicines, quality assured laboratory support, patient empowerment, a dedicated monitoring and evaluation system, and a robust referral system. We selected 9 primary health care clinics (PHC) and two hospitals in Chipinge district and integrated DM and HTN either into the general out-patient department, pre-existing HIV clinics, or an integrated chronic care clinic (ICCC). We provided structured intensive mentoring for staff, using simplified protocols, and disease-specific education for patients. Free medication with differentiated periodic refills and regular monitoring with point of care (POC) glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) were provided. Results Nurses in 7 PHC facilities and one hospital developed sufficient knowledge and skills to diagnose, initiate treatment and monitor DM and HTN patients, and 3094 patients were registered in the programme (188 with DM only, 2473 with HTN only, 433 with both DM and HTN). Major lessons learned from our experience include: the value of POC devices in the management of diabetes; the pressure on services of the added caseload, exacerbated by the availability of free medications in supported health facilities; and the importance of leadership in the successful implementation of care in health facilities. Conclusion Our experience demonstrates a model for nurse-led decentralized integrated DM and HTN care in a high HIV prevalence rural, low-income context. Developing a context-adapted efficient model of care is a dynamic process. We present our lessons learned with the intention of sharing experience which may be of value to other public health programme managers.

Serology for SARS-CoV-2: Apprehensions, opportunities, and the path forward

2 mesi 2 settimane ago
Serology for SARS-CoV-2: Apprehensions, opportunities, and the path forward Bryant, JE; Azman, AS; Ferrari, MJ; Arnold, BF; Boni, MF; Boum, Y; Hayford, K; Luquero, FJ; Mina, MJ; Rodriguez-Barraquer, I; Wu, JT; Wade, D; Vernet, G; Leung, DT Serological testing for SARS-CoV-2 has enormous potential to contribute to COVID-19 pandemic response efforts. However, the required performance characteristics of antibody tests will critically depend on the use case (individual-level vs. population-level).

Gaps in Hepatitis B Vaccination Completion and Sero-Protection for People Who Inject Drugs in Hpakant, Myanmar, 2015-2018

2 mesi 3 settimane ago
Gaps in Hepatitis B Vaccination Completion and Sero-Protection for People Who Inject Drugs in Hpakant, Myanmar, 2015-2018 Yee, NS; Naing, AY; Cuesta, JG; Das, M; Dave, K Hepatitis B vaccination (HBV) is recommended for high-risk groups, such as people who inject drugs (PWIDs). As part of a harm reduction program by a non-governmental organization, hepatitis B screening, vaccination and antibody (HBAb) testing after completion of the vaccination schedule were offered to PWIDS in Myanmar. We determined the proportions of HBV non-completion and sero-unprotection among PWIDs enrolled in the program and their association with socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. We conducted a descriptive study based on routine program data in five selected clinics in Hpakant Township, Myanmar. PWIDs who were Hepatitis B antigen negative at screening during January 2015-December 2018 were included. Among 5386 participants eligible for HBV, 9% refused vaccination. Among those who accepted vaccination (n = 3177 individuals), 65% completed vaccination. Of those tested for HBsAb (n = 2202), 30% were sero-unprotected. Young-adults (aged 18-44 years) and migrant workers had a higher risk of incomplete vaccination. However, participants who used methadone had a lower risk of incomplete vaccination. Migrant workers had higher risk of not returning for HBsAb testing and HIV-positive participants had a higher risk of being HBV sero-unprotected. Efforts to increase HBV vaccination in PWIDs for young adults and clients during methadone and anti-retroviral services should be prioritized.

Factors influencing the return of inactive blood donors in a Cameroonian blood bank

3 mesi 2 settimane ago
Factors influencing the return of inactive blood donors in a Cameroonian blood bank Ndoumba, AM; Tagny, CT; Nzedzou, G; Boum II, Y; Mbanya, D Identify factors that influence the return of donors to increase their loyalty while improving blood safety is crucial in our context. Between October 2017 and April 2018, we conducted a descriptive cross-sectional study at the Blood Bank of the Yaoundé University Teaching Hospital. The study included all former donors who had not donated blood voluntarily for over a year. Quantitative variables were described using means and standard deviations. Fisher's exact test and Chi2 test were used for association measures between qualitative variables. Statistical test results were considered significant for a P<0.05 value. We interviewed a total of 101 inactive donors. The study population was 74.3% male, donors average 30±7 years. Female gender and good staff hospitality were the factors most associated with the intention to return. The barriers to donor return were mainly lack of information on blood needs (35.60%) and time constraint for blood donation (26.73%). Pro-social motivations such as altruism (30.70%) were the main possible sources of motivation cited. To reduce blood deficiency and mortality due to lack of blood products, non-financial material compensation, good outreach and communication strategy can increase inactive donors' loyalty and consequently in improving blood safety in our context. We regret this article is behind a paywall.

Checked

18 minuti 8 secondi ago
The DSpace digital repository system captures, stores, indexes, preserves, and distributes digital research material.
SubscribeIscriviti a Feed Medici Senza Frontiere - feed